3D ABS sculpture

Huge 3D printed ABS sculpture

https://youtu.be/tIHdCCVHUhs

The world of 3D printers is now included in the majority of production processes thanks to technological stability and the improvement of technical materials such as ABS. The fields of applications are endless: medical, construction, production, ceramics up to the world of sculpture.
In this case WASP realized a 4 meter by 2.5 meter sculpture in ABS with the Delta WASP 3MT industrial 4.0 3D printer.

3D Scanning

We started with a small sculpture of a stylized bull, which was later to be replicated on a monumental scale.
Let's start with a 3D scan

3D scanning with Artec Eva

In this project we used the Artec Eva 3D scanner, a tool for acquiring objects using structured light. It is a process in which a luminous pattern is projected onto the surface of the piece that will determine the digital reconstruction of the subject.

The file obtained was resized by scaling it from 20cm to 400cm. To 3D print objects of this size you need a large 3D printer and a quick printing process.

Pellet extruder for ABS

The solution is the Delta WASP 3MT Industrial 4.0 3D printer, which thanks to its size is able to make objects up to 1 meter of print even in ABS. Furthermore, the possibility of printing with the pellet extruder, allows the use of nozzles with a diameter up to 3mm, and therefore print objects with a layer height 10 times higher than normal. .

This means that normally by printing with the classic filament and using nozzles with a diameter of 0.4mm, a 10-hour piece with the pellet extruder can be made in just 1 hour.

On the other hand, the possibility of reducing printing times by raising the layer height value inevitably creates a coarser surface, characterized by the various printing layers. For many in the design world it also becomes an aesthetic and design feature such as the Iride or the Bike Chair.

Before and after ABS post production

But we will see in the following chapters how to eliminate the various layers during post production. .

Continuous printing in ABS with Delta WASP 3MT Industrial 4.0

Once scaled the sculpture, through Meshmixer software it was divided into several parts to optimize the fabrication times. Four printers worked in sync producing 2 pieces per printer per day.

3D printed ABS pieces with Delta WASP 3MT Industrial 4.0
3d printed ABS parts assembling

Thanks to the technical improvements we implemented on the Delta WASP 3MT industrial 4.0 3D printer, in 3 days the 25 pieces in ABS were ready to be assembled.

The 50kg pellet tank with auto power supply and the material end sensor allowed the printers to work 24 hours a day without ever stopping. The system essentially recognizes when the pellet is almost finished inside the extruder and automatically feeds itself.

Tank for Pellet material

3D sculpture: ABS is an excellent material for post production

As the printers finished producing the missing pieces, two WASP operators began assembling the parts already made.

3D printed sculpture in ABS

The choice of the material to be printed is very important, especially in terms of end use:
should it be placed outdoors?
will it be subjected to heat sources?
will it have to withstand impacts or compressions?

In addition, the choice must also be made considering whether the finished product must be sanded, painted or otherwise subject to post-production processes .

3D printed sculpture 4m x 2.5m

The 3D printed sculpture in question had to be smooth, painted and placed in a garden, so the choice of ABS was the perfect solution for this application.

3D sculpture and post production: ABS Juice

A mixture of acetone and ABS granules (you can also use waste or ABS supports), was used as a glue between the various printed parts. . 

ABS parts fixing

The diluted ABS in acetone allows a perfect adhesion / fusion between the various sections making the sculpture a single solid object, resistant to heat and weathering. .
Moreover, if used as a filler, the mixture is perfect to even out the entire surface

Finsihing with ABS Juice

With a spatula, gloves and mask, getting to the smooth piece is a snap.
Finally sandpaper in hand and the sculpture is ready ;-)

Painted sculpture

Large scale 3D printed art installation

WASP & Arthur Mamou-Mani: CONIFERA project for COS

CONIFERA Project is an example of digital fabrication and innovation technology

The fashion brand COS together with the architect Arthur Mamou-Mani presented a large-scale 3D printed architectural installation: CONIFERA Project. It was created for the Milano Design Week 2019 from renewable bioplastic bricks and made by WASP thanks to a 3D printer Delta WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL 4.0.

CONIFERA Project is really ambitious: Studio Arthur together with the Milan, Venice and Macerata’s WASP Hub created the largest 3D project in the world. This was possible thanks to a WASP Hubs network that created 700 pieces with the DELTA WASP 3MT Industrial 4.0. This new Industry 4.0 line could print big dimensions objects in short times, in this case using bioplastics and recycled plastics.

This is the first real concrete example of widespread manufacturing, a unique project that represents the WASP’s soul. A work realized together with the remote work of this network of digital manufacturing centers that use WASP technology, to create an incredible shared print, one of the largest in the world.

This project is an international work that really explains innovation, versatility, speed and precision of the WASP printers.

700 printed forms.

Single module printing time: 80 minutes
Material: PLA

Designadditive manufacturing are the keyword to create new form and realize new creation forms, to apply also to the industrial sector and not only to the digital craftsmanship.

Conifera project is a 3D printed installation created with Delta WASP 3MT Industrial 
using PLA Designed by Arthur Mamou-Mani

DELTA WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL 4.0
stampante 3d industriale

Baby, 3D printed sculpture

The applications related to digital manufacturing are endless. If we combine the fact that the tools used are the Delta WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL, then 3D printers for large objects, the results are becoming more and more impressive.

https://youtu.be/D9TY94Ql0p4

Digital sculpt
The artist Luca Tarlazzi, who has been a WASP collaborator for the comic "Viaggio a Shamballa" for a year, has always been linked to the world of sculpture. In recent years, with the development and improvement of software, his sculpture has become digital. In fact, Luca using ZBrush, a digital sculpture software, invests his time in the creation of sculptures. After that the process ends with the printing of the pieces. The limit so far was the size too small and the materials post-workable. Now with the Delta WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL, Luca manages to achieve his objectives, realizing digital statues in real scale, depositing thermoplastic materials starting from the pellets.

This is how the statue "Baby" was born, a young girl sitting with her eyes turned towards the sky. You do not know what you look at, what dreams, but surely it's something beautiful. A process, the one put in place by Tarlazzi, which fits exactly into the world of digital manufacturing, passing from the idea to the project on the pc, to the 3D printing. This was the development of the statue, which ended with a manual post-processing with stucco and paint to give the final touch. The statue was presented in Milan during the Technology Hub 2018 exhibition, sitting right above the one who gave it life, the Delta WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL.

Luca Tarlazzi's studio is now continuing with the use of the Delta WASP Clay line, which allows him an even closer approach to traditional techniques.

How do you make a large statue printed in 3D?
The statue was designed with a digital sculpture software: ZBrush.

https://youtu.be/Vwlrkeo7Q8A

Errors can occur with software of this kind, like for example open edges. In these cases a very useful software is Mesh Mixer. To make the printing easier, the the same software has been used to divide the statue into several parts, and this have avoided the use of support-materials. So the bust, the legs the arms, being large elements, were printed with Delta WASP 3MT Industrial with Pellet extruder, which allows speed and stability. By replacing pellet extrude with Spitfire extruder in 10 minutes it is possible to switch from fast prints and very high layers printings, to more detailed and precise prints. Thanks to Spitfire on the Delta WASP 3MT Industrial the head, the hands and the feet were realized with a 1.2 mm diameter nozzle and a 0.5 mm layer height.

Assembly e stuccoing
The various parts were welded together with metal pins embedded in the plastic to allow stiffness and tightness. To make the entire surface of the piece homogeneous, an ad hoc stucco was used, easy to apply and excellent for hand-finishing. Finally the statue was painted with acrylic colors. With this approach it is possible to realize in a short time a statue of 2.2 meters in height.

"Baby" by Luca Tarlazzi


Trabeculae Pavilion 3d printed by Delta WASP

 Trabeculae Pavilion at Politecnico di Milano © Gabriele Seghizzi

A lightweight architecture completely 3D printed by a WASP printer farm

WASP announces the completion of Trabeculae Pavilion, a lightweight architecture completely 3D printed that fuses advancements in 3D printing with bio-inspired computational design.

The synergy of design, material and manufacturing technologies allowed the conceptualization of an innovative construction technique based on an additive process which builds architectural forms conceived with a load-responsive material organization.

Five WASP printers worked H24

The fabrication process of the building components was based on four Delta WASP 4070 and a Delta WASP 60100, a WASP 3d printers farm installed in the laboratories of Department ABC of Politecnico di Milano, where parallel production processes have been run for a continuous production of 4352 hours in total.

The use of WASP Spitfire extruder was introduced for the first time to shape stiff components within a minimized amount of time.

Delta WASP Farm at work during the production © Roberto Naboni

The prototype is the result of the doctoral research of Roberto Naboni who has designed and developed the pavilion at Politecnico di Milano, together with a team of specialists in experimental design and construction.

The project looks into 3D Printing for answers to the emerging problem of scarcity in material resources. The design is based on a computational process that finds inspiration in Nature, specifically in the materialization logics of the trabeculae, the internal cells that form the bone microstructure.

From this investigation, custom algorithms have been developed to support the creation of a cellular load-responsive structure with continuous variations in sizing, topology, orientation and section, in order to maximize material efficiency.

“The last decades have witnessed an exponential growth in the demandof raw materials due to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of emerging economies. This research looks at biological models andat the opportunities offered by the new additive production technologies in order to find sustainable solutions to the exploitation of materials. Our objective is to explore a new model of construction: advanced, efficient and sustainable” declare Roberto Naboni, Architect and currently Assistant Professor at University of Southern Denmark (SDU).

 Trabeculae Pavilion at Politecnico di Milano © Gabriele Seghizzi

The built pavilion is a load-responsive shell composed by 352 components covering a total area of 36 square meters, shaped additively by a 112 kilometers-long extrusion of a high-resistance biopolymer, specifically developed with industrial partner FILOALFA® to elevate Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) to construction purposes.

The innovative methods involved for the design allow for an efficient material distribution at multiple scales, which permits an extremely resistant and lightweight structure with a variable weight to area ratio of 6 to 10 kg/m2 - about ten times lighter than typical construction techniques with comparable mechanical performance.

Beyond its technical features, the pavilion is an outstanding expression of a tectonic system conceived with and for 3D Printing, which enables multiple high-res optimization logics with the precision of a tenth of a millimeter.

PROJECT INFORMATION

Address: Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano, Italy

Completion: July 2018

Area: 36 m²

Weight: 335 kg

Weight to Area Ratio: 9.3 kg/m²

Overall Dimensions: 7,5m x 6,0m x 3,6m

Extrusion length: 112 km

Combined Printing Hours: 4352

PROJECT CREDITS

Trabeculae Pavilion è un progetto di ricerca promosso da ACTLAB:   Prof. Roberto Naboni (University of Southern Denmark - SDU), Prof. Ingrid Paoletti (Politecnico di Milano)

Team di Ricerca, Design e Sviluppo: Roberto Naboni (Investigatore Principale e Leader di Progetto), Anja Kunić (Design Computazionale), Luca Breseghello (Design Computazionale)

Dottorato sviluppato presso il dipartimento ABC del Politecnico di Milano: Tutor Ingrid Paoletti, Relatore Enrico De Angelis

Fabbricazione e Costruzione: Mithun Kumar Thiyagarajan, Gabriele Seghizzi

In collaborazione con: Francesco Martelli (Analisi Strutturale) and ITKE - University of Stuttgart: Valentin Koslowski, Jan Knippers (Analisi Strutturale e Test Materiali)

Collaboratori: Verley Henry Côco Jr., Rahul Sehgal, Elena Kriklenko, Maia Zheliazkova, Hamed Abbasi, Francesco Pasi, Sibilla Ferroni

Partner Industriali: WASP (Stampanti 3D), FILOALFA® (Materiali Polimerici)

Supportato con il contributo di: SAPERLAB - Laboratorio Unico Dipartimento ABC (Politecnico di Milano), MADE Expo, RESEARCH FUNDS Ingrid Paoletti


scenografia stampata in 3d

The first 3d printed Scenography

WASP has printed the scenery of the play "Fra Diavolo", of the “Opera” Theater in Roma.

3d printed scenography

3d Printing at “Opera” Theatre in Rome

A 3d printed scenography for a theatre play. Perhaps it's the first time it happens; for sure there are no similar examples in the other national theater fittings: 3d printing has been used to create masks and furniture components, never an impressive scenic stage.  It happens in Rome, for the Daniel Auber's "Fra Diavolo" play, directed by Giorgio Barberio Corsetti, conductor Rory McDonald, on stage at the Opera Theater on October 8, 2017, in replica until 21: WASP is proud to be a technology partner of this event.

https://youtu.be/vrKxwH8JZZc

WASP has mounted a Delta WASP 3MT INDUSTRIAL next to the entrance of the Roman Opera. The big printer will be there working until the "first" Sunday of October (8th) , and the WASP engineers will feature in  the 3D printing  of a statue representing the Fra Diavolo character (on a scale 1:1).

wasp-teatro-dellopera-fradiavolo-entrato-teatro_


When Art generates job and products further to Industry inspiration

"We are sure," said Carlo Fuortes, "that what we experienced  for the first time how to performe a scene in  the technique of the future: 3d print. Moreover, the story of theatrical performance has always been a story of inventions and  experimentation of techniques and materials. Today 3d printing is already present in all design work but also in building elements in various productive areas. Here, for the first time, thanks to WASP's commitment and work, it is employed to build the scenery of a lyric".

"The challenge presented to us by the Opera Theater was a very risky-one - said  Massimo Moretti, WASP founder, during the conference - It had never happened that 3d printing was applied to such a large size project. The plastic we normally use to print has a huge cost when used to produce the 1500 Kg of the scenery. So we decided to  turn to a cheaper material, one  that, when the scenery will no longer be used, can be easily recycled, shredded and reused for a new and different work. For this job at first we rented a shed near our home, now this shed is ours and we are the only 3d printing company able to produce very large objects. This is the case of Fra Diavolo, where art is dragging the industry and opening up new creations and new job opportunities. "

la-scenografia-del-fra-diavolo_corsettiregistafuortessovrmorettiwaspmacdonalddirettore


The first 3d printed scenography

When asked to make the scene of the work, the WASP team was surprised, but as it always happens, it immediately accepted the challenge. The works started in mid-April and have ended in mid-July, with the delivery of the scenic components to the Roman Theater.

The venture started when the scenographer gave Wasp a 3d printed model of two deformed historic buildings, two large facades with windows and terraces, similar to a Dalí picture: the deformed perception of reality is a central element of the work, which necessarily reflects also in its scenographic structure. The director, supported by Rome's Superintendent, Carlo Fuortes, who is deeply confident in using 3d printing for studio and stage design, has chosen the 3d printing as the best possible solutions to achieve the desired result.

scenografia-teatrale-stampata-in-3d-modello02

The 3d model was a unit block, and it had to be subdivided into 223 pieces that could fit into the Delta WASP 3MT print size, which is a 1 meter x 1 meter cylinder. The material used is PLA colored of white pigment. To tackle the work, the WASP team has used 5 printers, working at full speed during the last three months in the new warehouse where this out of the ordinary project, has been planned and realised.

34724877185_ed5a4bdfb5_k

The biggest challenge was not to overtake the deadline. Thanks to a good work planning and to the speed of the WASP machines, the result came without any special problems at the set deadline: in mid-July the warehouse-floor was completely filled with pieces of the scenography, ready to be sent to Rome.

In the capital, within the spaces of the Opera House, the components were assembled and fixed on a wooden carrying structure. A few small inaccuracies did not compromise the outcome, on the contrary they emphasized the craftsmanship and the special character of the work, and the director welcomed the final result with great satisfaction. It was a test, an experiment, and a successful achievement that could pave the way for new future collaboration between theatre and 3d printing industry.

laboratori-teatro-dellopera-roma-8

Giorgio Barbiero Corsetti interview: